Juliet Mousseau, R.S.C.J.

  • Assistant Professor of Church History

mousseau@ai.edu

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Historical Theology (Saint Louis University, 2006)
  • M.A., Historical Theology (Saint Louis University, 2002)
  • B.A., (Gonzaga University, 2000)

I grew up in Montana and was raised Catholic but knew little about my faith. In college at Gonzaga University, I began to study theology and became enthralled with all that our church and our faith has to offer. My deepest questions were being explored, and I decided to continue that exploration in graduate school at Saint Louis University.

I began the historical theology program at SLU interested in studying the origins of Gregorian chant, which led me deep into the medieval Christian world. Throughout my studies of early and medieval theology and history, I found that the interplay between life and theological expression intrigued me. I was fascinated to learn the evolution of theological concepts throughout time, and to examine closely how the culture and contemporary needs of each period affected theologians.

After graduating in 2006, I began to discern a call to religious life, where I believe God was calling me all along. I entered the Society of the Sacred Heart in August 2009, and I am preparing to make my first vows in the summer of 2012, before beginning to teach at the Aquinas Institute in the fall.

Throughout all of my studies, I felt called to teach theology. To me teaching is more about building relationships with students than it is about imparting knowledge. By getting to know my students personally, I can encourage them to develop their unique gifts, to become more fully the person God created them to be. I want each one to think and to interact with what they learn, so that it becomes part of who they are.

One of the tensions for me in teaching church history is how to make it relevant to the world today. For me, the history shows that the church has evolved to face the needs of each era, and in that evolution we can see both the humanity of the institution and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. I believe that teaching those who are ministering in our church to see those two sides makes church history relevant to our rapidly changing world.

Selected Publications

“Adam of Saint Victor: Sequences” in On Love edited by Hugh Feiss, O.S.B., volume 2, Victorine Texts in Translation: Exegesis, Theology and Spirituality from the Abbey of St Victor. Turnhout: Brepols, 2011; New City Press, 2012.
“Adam of Saint Victor: Sequences” in Trinity and Creation edited by Boyd Taylor Coolman and Dale M. Coulter, volume 1, Victorine Texts in Translation: Exegesis, Theology and Spirituality from the Abbey of St Victor. Turnhout: Brepols, 2010; New City Press, 2011.
“God’s Irresistible Call Invites Us to Hope.” Review for Religious 69.2 (2010), 173-179.
Forthcoming: Adam of Saint Victor’s Sequences: Latin Text and English Translation, with Introduction and Notes, to be published in Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations Series, general editor Philipp W. Rosemann. Accepted for publication, expected to come forth in 2012.

Presentations

  • “Everyone Is Called by God: Talking about Vocation,” University of Dallas Ministry Conference, October 2009
  • “Growing in Relationship with God: Spiritual Wisdom for Today,” University of Dallas Ministry Conference, October 2008
  • “Victorine Pneumatology: The Pentecost Liturgy’s Theological Significance,” International Conference on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2007
  • “Medicines for All Our Sins: Hugh of Saint Victor’s Theology of the Holy Spirit,” International Conference on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2006
  • “Victorine Exegesis at Work: The Sequences of Adam of Saint Victor,” International Conference on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2005
  • “Light: Image of the Holy Spirit in Adam of Saint Victor,” International Conference on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2004
  • “Trinity as Poetry: Adam of Saint Victor’s Trinitarian Theology in the Sequence Profitentes Unitatem,” International Conference on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2003